Tag archives: poet

Sojourner Kincaid Rolle’s ‘Free at Last’ Book Release
By Joanne Calitri   |   September 27, 2022

The poet, playwright, activist, and local elder for Santa Barbara County Black History, Sojourner Kincaid Rolle, has released a new book titled Free at Last: A Juneteenth Poem, illustrated by Alex Bostic, published by Sterling Books/Union Square Kids. This hardcover 10 x 10 inch 32-page poem/picture book tells the story of the end of slavery […]

Chaucer’s Choices
By Steven Libowitz   |   April 26, 2022

This week, Chaucer’s Books’ event schedule includes a rare paid event, an outdoor one at that, featuring Max Brallier, the multiple New York Times bestselling author and Netflix series creator. Ever so clever, Chaucer’s is calling the event “Last Kids on Earth, Day” in honor, not only of Brallier’s epic, eight-book adventure series that was […]

Idle Pleasantrees
By Ashleigh Brilliant   |   August 5, 2021

A man named Joyce Kilmer managed to publish five books and have five children before being killed in World War I. But he is remembered only for one imperishable poem, called “Trees,” which concludes with the modest words: “Poems are made by fools like me,But only God can make a tree.” True enough, I suppose, […]

Willis’ Poetry Offers ‘Somewhere to Follow’
By Scott Craig   |   July 29, 2021

In a new book of poetry, Paul J. Willis takes his readers on a path through California’s coastal redwoods and giant sequoias in the Sierra, weaving in adolescent practical jokes and sharing unexpected epiphanies. Slant Books published the latest book by the Westmont professor of English and former Santa Barbara poet laureate.  Willis’ seventh volume […]

Arts In Lockdown #29: Rod Rolle, Photographer and Musician
By Joanne Calitri   |   June 10, 2021

Rod Rolle is both an esteemed professional news and public relations photographer and local jazz drummer with Tom Murray of 30 years in their duo, The Stiff Pickle Orchestra. His motto “Images with A Global View” is most accurate, currently an affiliate with SIPA USA, he has worked as a stringer for Getty Images, Associated […]

Montecito Author Releases New Poetry Book
By Kelly Mahan Herrick   |   May 6, 2021

OPEN, the newest book of poetry by Susan Read Cronin, explores issues of love, life, death, and family. Sometimes written as seen through the eyes of a child, Cronin’s poems remind the reader of what it is like to try to make sense of the world around us. Weaving steadily between dark and light, her […]

Poof! The Magic Castle Cabaret is Gone
By Richard Mineards   |   April 8, 2021

Two years after it opened, the owners of Montecito’s Magic Castle Cabaret Milt and Arlene Larsen are moving on, I can exclusively reveal. “The Cabaret has been closed for a long year and we are not getting any younger,” laments Arlene. “When we started, we seemed a lot younger. “After talking it over for many […]

Potent Potable Poetry
By Steven Libowitz   |   April 23, 2020

If COVID-19 hadn’t caused everything to come to a close, and everyone to halt, suddenly in the middle of March, George Yatchisin would be hosting the sixth annual “Spirits in the Air: Potent Potable Poetry” reading at The Good Lion lounge this Friday, April 24, when the “Drinkable Landscape” columnist for Edible Santa Barbara and […]

Radhule & Raab on Writing
By Steven Libowitz   |   February 20, 2020

Radhule Weininger, Ph.D., and Diana Raab, Ph.D., are teaming up once again to offer a three-hour training in Mindfulness Meditation and Journaling this weekend. Raab, a longtime Montecito-based memoirist, poet, essayist, blogger and speaker whose latest book is titled Writing for Bliss: A Seven-Step Plan for Telling Your Story and Transforming Your Life, and Weininger, […]

Ruminating with Rumi
By Steven Libowitz   |   February 6, 2020

Montecito’s Rumi Educational Center’s mission is to spread understanding of the poetry of the famed Sufi mystic Jala Al Din Rumi in order to promote his wisdom teachings of Universal Love. The goal is to enable learners of all backgrounds to experience the messages of pluralism, tolerance, humanism and non-violence that are rooted in Rumi’s […]

Noah (and Jacob) Bake Bread for the Soul
By Steven Libowitz   |   February 6, 2020

More than three decades ago, Noah benShea created Jacob the Baker, a simple but wise character whose plainspoken wisdom and commonsense approach to life are delivered as parables and often funny pearls of wisdom. The Jacob books, four in total now after We Are All Jacob’s Children ended a 20-year hiatus in 2018, have provided […]

Spoken Word Shorts
By Steven Libowitz   |   February 6, 2020

Dr. Mary-Claire King, the renowned human geneticist who discovered the genetic mutation responsible for breast cancer, revolutionizing the course of cancer research and transforming the way patients are diagnosed and treated, discusses the genetics of inherited cancers in a free public lecture titled “The Genetics of Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer: From Gene Discovery to […]

Downtown Talk Explores Essays on Love, Wonder
By Scott Craig   |   October 10, 2019

Paul Willis, Westmont professor of English, will read selections from his award-winning collection, To Build a Trail: Essays on Curiosity, Love and Wonder, Tuesday, October 15, at 5:30 pm in the University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara Street.  The Westmont Downtown Lecture, “Not about the Numbers: What Really Matters in How We Learn,” is free and […]

Surprise Summer Exhibit Features New Gifts
By Scott Craig   |   July 18, 2019

The Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art is showing off its newest treasures this summer in “The Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collections,” through early August. The museum is open Monday through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm and closed weekends and college holidays during the summer. For more information, please visit westmont.edu/museum or contact […]

Jodie Hollander’s Healing Flight from Classicism
By Jeff Wing   |   January 24, 2019

Jodie Hollander grew up in a musical family, and that is a largish understatement. Concert pianist father, cellist mother, two sibs each with the gift of drawing effortless gossamer from the violin; dinner conversation ran to the rhapsodic. Now imagine Jodie – a young girl whose double helix would later reveal itself as a ladder […]

Seeking Light
By Richard Mineards   |   January 16, 2019

The late Santa Barbara artist and poet Margaret Singer, who died at the age of 98 last year, is the focus of a new documentary by local director and documentary maker Louise Palanker. The 20-minute short “Margaret Singer: Seeking Light” tells how the Frankfurt-born citizen fled Nazism and lost her family in the Holocaust, moving […]

Stanzas of Sojourns
By Steven Libowitz   |   August 16, 2018

Santa Barbara poet Daniel Thomas celebrates the recent publication of his first collection of poems, Deep Pockets, with a second reading of works from the book at 7 pm next Thursday, August 23, at Chaucer’s. The book traverses Thomas’s path from snowy Minnesota to lush Southern California, where he moved in 2015 to work at […]

Santa Barbara’s Poet Laureate (2007-2009)
By Beverlye Fead   |   March 15, 2018

Some people you meet in life by pure coincidence and others are put in your path. I do believe Perie Longo was not only put in my path for a reason but changed the course of my life forever. I was a painter when I met Perie, and now I am a writer; more about that […]