Tag archives: Indigenous

A Lesson From the Eighth Continent?
By Robert Bernstein   |   October 18, 2022

Over 20 years ago I attended a talk on Madagascar at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. It was one long rant about how the ecosystems of Madagascar had been almost totally destroyed. How there were no indigenous organizations for outside conservation groups to work with. And how the Pope had gone there to […]

Ishi Glinsky UCSB Retrospective Exhibit
By Joanne Calitri   |   October 11, 2022

I attended the opening of Ishi Glinsky’s solo exhibit titled Upon a Jagged Maze at the Art, Design & Architecture (ADA) Museum at UC Santa Barbara, sponsored by the ADA Museum’s Council. The exhibit is on view through January 22, 2023.  The 25 works from 2009 to 2022 were selected by museum Director Gabriel Ritter, […]

Museum Moments
By Steven Libowitz   |   September 13, 2022

Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s Parallel Stories investigates the concept that while something gets lost in translation, maybe also there’s something to be gained in the process, at least in relation to poetry, serving to build bridges across borders and between cultures via introducing new syntactic strategies, rhythms, and image repertoires. Poet, translator, and literary […]

‘Woke’ From My Tryptophan Slumber
By Gwyn Lurie   |   December 7, 2021

It may have slipped by you with everything else that’s been going on lately — the new variant and two national murder cases — that this year was our country’s 400th Thanksgiving! And all was going well at my family’s annual Turkey Day celebration at my sister’s home in Los Angeles. Until my sister made […]

San Marcos Foothills: Rich in History
By Lucy Marx   |   March 25, 2021

Julie Cordero-Lamb is an ethnobotanist and a member of the Coastal Band of the Chumash Nation. She joined the effort to protect San Marcos Foothills nearly twenty years ago. She has a unique perspective on the site, which is important to her and to the Chumash community. “We have a connection to that place that […]

Flor de Maiz Brings Indigenous Meals with a Twist
By Claudia Schou   |   September 17, 2020

Complex, intriguing, and utterly delicious, Oaxacan cuisine – with its roots in southeastern Mexico, where proud indigenous people fine-tuned the art of Mexican cooking over centuries – is making its way into the hearts (and stomachs) of Santa Barbarans at Flor de Maiz. The latest concept by restaurateur Carlos Luna, the restaurant opened last fall […]

A Trail of Tears
By Rinaldo Brutoco   |   May 21, 2020

In our recent four-part series, “New Federalism in a Post COVID-19 World,” we extensively reviewed the pre-Colonial origins, the subsequent history, and the modern evolution of the Federal government’s relationship with the individual states. That’s what the subject of “Federalism” usually means in a political context, as if the only governmental authorities in the United […]

Access to Alexis in our Anxious Times
By Steven Libowitz   |   April 9, 2020

Santa Barbara native Alexis Slutzky has spent decades as a wilderness guide, mentor, MFT, reclamation practitioner, and council trainer who also specializes in indigenous wisdom traditions, rites of passage, depth psychology, ritual and ceremony and community exploration. Her grief work – which has brought people from both far and wide to retreats at Arroyo Hondo […]

A Brave Life: Against All Odds
By Cecilia Rodriguez   |   March 12, 2020

When I think of my friend Miguel, the word “brave” is what comes to mind. One reason is because Miguel is Native American, a member of the Santa Barbara Chumash Band, and the word “brave” refers to a Native American warrior. Although Miguel has never, as least as far as I know, gone to battle […]

Lecture Examines Peaceful Native Americans
By Scott Craig   |   February 27, 2020

Richard Pointer, Westmont professor of history, uncovers the peacemaking traditions of Native American communities in a lecture, “Peace-loving Indians? Recovering A Missing Piece of American History,” on Tuesday, March 3, at 7 pm in Hieronymus Lounge at Kerrwood Hall. The Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture is free and open to the public. “Given […]

Native American Storytelling
By Kim Crail   |   February 13, 2020

Thursday, February 20 at 4 pm, we are hosting a presentation by Chumash and Tataviam Elder and proud California Native American Alan Salazar. Learn about traditional paddling of tomol (canoes) and more about tribal history and culture. Salazar has been a preschool teacher, juvenile institutions officer, Native American consultant/monitor, spiritual advisor and member of the […]